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The Resource Extraordinary, ordinary people : a memoir of family, Condoleezza Rice

Extraordinary, ordinary people : a memoir of family, Condoleezza Rice

Label
Extraordinary, ordinary people : a memoir of family
Title
Extraordinary, ordinary people
Title remainder
a memoir of family
Statement of responsibility
Condoleezza Rice
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
  • This volume is the personal account of American political scientist and diplomat Condoleezza Rice's (b. 1954) life and career. Rice served as Secretary of State in the administration of President George W. Bush. Rice was the first female African-American secretary of state, as well as the second African American (after Colin Powell), and the second woman (after Madeleine Albright). Rice was President Bush's National Security Advisor during his first term, making her the first woman to serve in that position. Her memoir presents a young woman deeply attached to her devoted parents, who encouraged her at every step of her life to overcome racism, sexism, and her own personal doubts. Her roots are deep in the South, part of a family that pridefully skirted racism -- never using the racially segregated facilities or riding in the back of the bus. Her mother, Angelena, was a cultured teacher who taught her piano, while her father, John, was a Presbyterian minister and later a college administrator who, despite his Republican politics, strongly admired black radicals, developing a friendship with Stokely Carmichael. Rice presents a frank, poignant, and loving portrait of a family that maintained its closeness through cancer, death, career ups and downs, and turbulent changes in American society
  • Condoleezza Rice has excelled as a diplomat, political scientist, and concert pianist. Her achievements run the gamut from helping to oversee the collapse of communism in Europe and the decline of the Soviet Union, to working to protect the country in the aftermath of 9-11, to becoming only the second woman - and the first black woman ever -- to serve as Secretary of State. But until she was 25 she never learned to swim. Not because she wouldn't have loved to, but because when she was a little girl in Birmingham, Alabama, Commissioner of Public Safety Bull Connor decided he'd rather shut down the city's pools than give black citizens access. Throughout the 1950's, Birmingham's black middle class largely succeeded in insulating their children from the most corrosive effects of racism, providing multiple support systems to ensure the next generation would live better than the last. But by 1963, when Rice was applying herself to her fourth grader's lessons, the situation had grown intolerable. Birmingham was an environment where blacks were expected to keep their head down and do what they were told -- or face violent consequences. That spring two bombs exploded in Rice's neighborhood amid a series of chilling Klu Klux Klan attacks. Months later, four young girls lost their lives in a particularly vicious bombing. So how was Rice able to achieve what she ultimately did? Her father, John, a minister and educator, instilled a love of sports and politics. Her mother, a teacher, developed Condoleezza's passion for piano and exposed her to the fine arts. From both, Rice learned the value of faith in the face of hardship and the importance of giving back to the community. Her parents' fierce unwillingness to set limits propelled her to the venerable halls of Stanford University, where she quickly rose through the ranks to become the university's second-in-command. An expert in Soviet and Eastern European Affairs, she played a leading role in U.S. policy as the Iron Curtain fell and the Soviet Union disintegrated. Less than a decade later, at the apex of the hotly contested 2000 presidential election, she received the exciting news -- just shortly before her father's death -- that she would go on to the White House as the first female National Security Advisor. As comfortable describing lighthearted family moments as she is recalling the poignancy of her mother's cancer battle and the heady challenge of going toe-to-toe with Soviet leaders, Rice holds nothing back in this remarkably candid telling. This is the story of Condoleezza Rice that has never been told, not that of an ultra-accomplished world leader, but of a little girl -- and a young woman -- trying to find her place in a sometimes hostile world and of two exceptional parents, and an extended family and community, that made all the difference. -- Book jacket
Biography type
contains biographical information
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1954-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Rice, Condoleezza
Dewey number
  • 327.730092
  • B
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • plates
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Rice, Condoleezza
  • Rice, Condoleezza
  • African American families
  • African Americans
  • Birmingham (Ala.)
  • Birmingham (Ala.)
  • Stateswomen
  • Women cabinet officers
  • African American women
Label
Extraordinary, ordinary people : a memoir of family, Condoleezza Rice
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 327-329) and index
Contents
Starting early -- The Rays and the Rices -- Married at last -- "Johnny, it's a girl" -- "I need a piano!" -- My parents were teachers -- Something in the water -- School days -- Summer respite -- Turning up the heat in Birmingham -- 1963 -- Integration? -- Tuscaloosa -- Denver again -- Leaving the South behind -- Cancer intrudes -- Starting early (again) -- College years -- A change of direction -- "Rally, sons (and daughters) of Notre Dame" -- A new start -- A lost year -- Senator Stanford's farm -- My rookie season -- The darkest moment of my life -- "The moving van is here" -- Inside the Pentagon -- Back to Stanford -- D.C. again -- "I don't think this is what Karl Marx had in mind" -- Back in California -- Learning compassion -- Finding a new president for Stanford -- Provost of the university -- Tough decisions -- The governor's campaign -- Florida -- "The Saints Go Marching In."
Control code
ocn505417102
Dimensions
25 cm.
Extent
342 p., [16] p. of plates
Isbn
9780307587879
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Lccn
2010021645
Other physical details
ill. (some col.)
System control number
(OCoLC)505417102
Label
Extraordinary, ordinary people : a memoir of family, Condoleezza Rice
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 327-329) and index
Contents
Starting early -- The Rays and the Rices -- Married at last -- "Johnny, it's a girl" -- "I need a piano!" -- My parents were teachers -- Something in the water -- School days -- Summer respite -- Turning up the heat in Birmingham -- 1963 -- Integration? -- Tuscaloosa -- Denver again -- Leaving the South behind -- Cancer intrudes -- Starting early (again) -- College years -- A change of direction -- "Rally, sons (and daughters) of Notre Dame" -- A new start -- A lost year -- Senator Stanford's farm -- My rookie season -- The darkest moment of my life -- "The moving van is here" -- Inside the Pentagon -- Back to Stanford -- D.C. again -- "I don't think this is what Karl Marx had in mind" -- Back in California -- Learning compassion -- Finding a new president for Stanford -- Provost of the university -- Tough decisions -- The governor's campaign -- Florida -- "The Saints Go Marching In."
Control code
ocn505417102
Dimensions
25 cm.
Extent
342 p., [16] p. of plates
Isbn
9780307587879
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Lccn
2010021645
Other physical details
ill. (some col.)
System control number
(OCoLC)505417102

Library Locations

    • Yuma County Wellton LibraryBorrow it
      28790 San Jose Ave Wellton, Yuma, AZ, 85356, US
      32.6717624 -114.1445445
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