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The Resource Woven stone, Simon J. Ortiz

Woven stone, Simon J. Ortiz

Label
Woven stone
Title
Woven stone
Statement of responsibility
Simon J. Ortiz
Creator
Contributor
Editor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
  • ""What I do as a writer, teacher, and storyteller is to demystify language," says Simon Ortiz. Widely regarded as one of the country's most important Native American poets, Ortiz has led a thirty-year career marked by a fascination with language?and by a love of his people. This omnibus of three previous works offers old and new readers an appreciation of the fruits of his dedication. Going for the Rain (1976) expresses closeness to a specific Native American way of life and its philosophy and is structured in the narrative form of a journey on the road of life. A Good Journey (1977), an evocation of Ortiz's constant awareness of his heritage, draws on the oral tradition of his Pueblo culture. Fight Back: For the Sake of the People, For the Sake of the Land (1980)?revised for this volume?has its origins in his work as a laborer in the uranium industry and is intended as a political observation and statement about that industry's effects on Native American lands and lives. In an introduction written for this volume, Ortiz tells of his boyhood in Acoma Pueblo, his early love for language, his education, and his exposure to the wider world. He traces his development as a writer, recalling his attraction to the Beats and his growing political awareness, especially a consciousness of his and other people's social struggle. "Native American writers must have an individual and communally unified commitment to their art and its relationship to their indigenous culture and people," writes Ortiz. "Through our poetry, prose, and other written works that evoke love, respect, and responsibility, Native Americans may be able to help the United States of America to go beyond survival." -- publisher's information
  • "Widely regarded as one the country's most important Native American poets, Simon Ortiz has had a thrity-year career marked by a fascination with language and by a love of his people. his omnibus of three previous works- 'Going for the Rain', 'A Good Journey' and 'Fight Back: for the Sake of the People, For the Sake of the Land'- offers old and new readers an appreciation of the fruits of his dedication." -- back cover
Member of
Cataloging source
DLC
Government publication
government publication of a state province territory dependency etc
Index
no index present
LC call number
PS53565.R77
LC item number
W68 1992
Literary form
non fiction
Series statement
Sun tracks
Series volume
v. 21
Target audience
general
Label
Woven stone, Simon J. Ortiz
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • "A wise and prophetic book." -- El Palacio
  • Introduction gives detailed accounts of legends and folklore of the Acoma Indian people
  • Collection of poetry and legends by the Acoma Indians taken from their native language and translated into English
Contents
  • To insure survival
  • They come around, the Wolves, and Coyote and Crow, too
  • Hesperus Camp, July 13, Indian 1971
  • Brothers and friends
  • A San Diego Poem: January-Febuary 1973
  • The Journey Begins
  • Shuddering
  • Under LA International Airport
  • Survival this way
  • Like myself, the source of these narratives is my home
  • And another one
  • Language
  • How to make a good chili stew
  • And there is always one more story
  • Notes for my child
  • Grand Canyon Christmas Eve 1969
  • My children
  • Speaking
  • This Magical Thing
  • Notes fo my child
  • Earth & rain, the plants & sun
  • Pout
  • Four bird songs
  • Burning River
  • A morning prayer and advice for a Rainbowdaughter
  • Canyon de Chelly
  • Baby bird prayers for my children,, Raho and Rainy
  • Between Alburquerque and Santa Fe
  • Fingers talking in the wind
  • Life Mississippi
  • A New Mexico place name
  • Back into the womb, the center
  • A birthday kid poem
  • Time and motion and space
  • How Much He Remembered
  • Woman, this Indian Woman
  • Watching Salmon jump
  • Some Indians at a party
  • Places we have been
  • Vada's in Cuba, New Mexico
  • Northern Maine
  • Indiandhead Bay
  • Ithaca, New York
  • Upstate
  • Buck Nez
  • How much Coyote remembered
  • Morning by a Lakeside in Marion County, S.C.
  • Woman Dreamer: Slender Oak Woman
  • Apache Love
  • Her story about saving herself
  • Two Coyote Ones
  • Will Come Forth in Tongues and Fury
  • A designated National Park
  • Long House Valley Poem
  • Belssings
  • The poet
  • Irish poets on Satruday and an Indian
  • ten O'Clock news in the American Midwest
  • Grants to Gallup, New Mexico
  • The following words...
  • "And the Land is just as dry"
  • Vision shadows
  • Heyaashi Guutah
  • Time to kill in Gallup
  • For our brothers: Blue Jay, Gold FInch, Flicker, Squirrel
  • The State's Claim
  • Mt father's song
  • Railroads
  • Electric Lines
  • Gas Lines
  • Highways
  • Phone Company
  • Cable TV
  • Right of Way
  • I Tell You Now
  • Waking
  • My Father Singing
  • Two women
  • This occurs to me
  • Uncle Jose
  • That time
  • When it was taking place
  • Poems from the Veterns Hospital
  • 8:50 AM Ft. Lyons VAH
  • Two Old Men
  • Damn Hard
  • Cherry Pie
  • Teeth
  • Poem for Jody about leaving
  • Traveling
  • Superchief--
  • Along the Arkansas River
  • Looking, Looking
  • For a Taos Man Heading South
  • I tell you now
  • Fight Back: For the Sake of the People, For the Sake of the Land
  • Mid-America Prayer
  • Too Many Sacrifices
  • It was that Indian
  • The Second: Leaving
  • Indians sure came in handy
  • Starting at the bottom
  • Ray's story
  • Affirmative Action
  • Crazy Gook Indians
  • Out to Tsaile Lake
  • The First Hard Core
  • To Change in a Good Way
  • Final Solution: Jobs, leaving
  • Stuff: Chickens and bombs
  • Introduction
  • Toward Spider Spring
  • That's the place Indians talk about
  • We have been told many things but we know this to be true
  • What I mean
  • Mama's and daddy's words
  • Retruning it back, you will go on
  • This song: Beating the heartbeat
  • It will come; It will come
  • No More Sacrifices
  • OUr Homeland; A National Sacrifice Area
  • A New Story
  • Arrival in sudden seaside fog this morning
  • Blue songs for the Phoenix bus depot derelict
  • Many farms notes
  • Old Hills
  • 21 August '71 Indian
  • Small things today
  • Travels in the South
  • relocation
  • Busride Conversation
  • Going for the rain
  • Portrait of a poet with a console TV in hand
  • Surprise
  • Early morning
  • making an acquintance
  • Without you
  • The poems I have lost
  • How close
  • Last night
  • Today, the A-train, 168th to 14th
  • Hunger in New York City
  • Prologue
  • Traveled all the way to New York City
  • For those sisters & brothers in Gallup
  • Evening beach walk
  • A patience poem for the child that was me
  • The Third: Returning
  • The Wisconsin Horse
  • A barroom fragment
  • Four Years Ago
  • Horizons and rains
  • Leaving America
  • The first: The Preparation
  • Washyuma Motor Hotel
  • Passing through Little Rock
  • Sometimes it's better to laugh, "honest injun"
  • Missing that Indian name of Roy or Ray
  • Crossing the Colorado River into Yuma
  • Valley of the Sun
  • A dying warrior
  • I told you I like Indians
  • The significance of a Veteran's Day
  • To and fro
  • The Creation, According to Coyote
  • Fragment
  • Notes on the steps of the San Diego bus depot
  • East of San Diego
  • Crow
  • Returned from California
  • Pain
  • Wind and Glacier voices
  • Alburquerque back again
  • East of Tucumcari -- t Watching you
  • Bend the River
  • Forming Child
  • The Fourth: The Rain Falls
  • Earth Woman
  • Spreading wings on wind
  • For Nanao
  • The Boy and Coyote
  • My Children, and a prayer for us
  • Four Deetseyamah poems
  • My mother and my sisters
  • What Joy said on two occasions
  • Juanita, Wife of Manuelito
  • Four poems for child son
  • A pretty woman
  • Bony
  • Two Acoma pictures
  • For Rainy's book
  • A deer dinner
  • A Snowy Mountain Song
  • Yuusthiwa
  • Hawk
  • Buzzard
  • Dry Rock in a Wash
  • The Expectant father
  • Curly mustahce, 101 year old Navajo man
  • Four rains
  • Morning star
  • A Story of how a wall stands
  • For Joy to leave upon
  • It doesn't end, of course
  • A Good Journey
  • Preface
  • Telling
  • Telling about Coyote
Control code
ocm25629689
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
xiv, 365 pages
Isbn
9780816513307
Isbn Type
(pbk. : alk. paper)
Lccn
92012507
System control number
(Sirsi) i0816512949
Label
Woven stone, Simon J. Ortiz
Publication
Note
  • "A wise and prophetic book." -- El Palacio
  • Introduction gives detailed accounts of legends and folklore of the Acoma Indian people
  • Collection of poetry and legends by the Acoma Indians taken from their native language and translated into English
Contents
  • To insure survival
  • They come around, the Wolves, and Coyote and Crow, too
  • Hesperus Camp, July 13, Indian 1971
  • Brothers and friends
  • A San Diego Poem: January-Febuary 1973
  • The Journey Begins
  • Shuddering
  • Under LA International Airport
  • Survival this way
  • Like myself, the source of these narratives is my home
  • And another one
  • Language
  • How to make a good chili stew
  • And there is always one more story
  • Notes for my child
  • Grand Canyon Christmas Eve 1969
  • My children
  • Speaking
  • This Magical Thing
  • Notes fo my child
  • Earth & rain, the plants & sun
  • Pout
  • Four bird songs
  • Burning River
  • A morning prayer and advice for a Rainbowdaughter
  • Canyon de Chelly
  • Baby bird prayers for my children,, Raho and Rainy
  • Between Alburquerque and Santa Fe
  • Fingers talking in the wind
  • Life Mississippi
  • A New Mexico place name
  • Back into the womb, the center
  • A birthday kid poem
  • Time and motion and space
  • How Much He Remembered
  • Woman, this Indian Woman
  • Watching Salmon jump
  • Some Indians at a party
  • Places we have been
  • Vada's in Cuba, New Mexico
  • Northern Maine
  • Indiandhead Bay
  • Ithaca, New York
  • Upstate
  • Buck Nez
  • How much Coyote remembered
  • Morning by a Lakeside in Marion County, S.C.
  • Woman Dreamer: Slender Oak Woman
  • Apache Love
  • Her story about saving herself
  • Two Coyote Ones
  • Will Come Forth in Tongues and Fury
  • A designated National Park
  • Long House Valley Poem
  • Belssings
  • The poet
  • Irish poets on Satruday and an Indian
  • ten O'Clock news in the American Midwest
  • Grants to Gallup, New Mexico
  • The following words...
  • "And the Land is just as dry"
  • Vision shadows
  • Heyaashi Guutah
  • Time to kill in Gallup
  • For our brothers: Blue Jay, Gold FInch, Flicker, Squirrel
  • The State's Claim
  • Mt father's song
  • Railroads
  • Electric Lines
  • Gas Lines
  • Highways
  • Phone Company
  • Cable TV
  • Right of Way
  • I Tell You Now
  • Waking
  • My Father Singing
  • Two women
  • This occurs to me
  • Uncle Jose
  • That time
  • When it was taking place
  • Poems from the Veterns Hospital
  • 8:50 AM Ft. Lyons VAH
  • Two Old Men
  • Damn Hard
  • Cherry Pie
  • Teeth
  • Poem for Jody about leaving
  • Traveling
  • Superchief--
  • Along the Arkansas River
  • Looking, Looking
  • For a Taos Man Heading South
  • I tell you now
  • Fight Back: For the Sake of the People, For the Sake of the Land
  • Mid-America Prayer
  • Too Many Sacrifices
  • It was that Indian
  • The Second: Leaving
  • Indians sure came in handy
  • Starting at the bottom
  • Ray's story
  • Affirmative Action
  • Crazy Gook Indians
  • Out to Tsaile Lake
  • The First Hard Core
  • To Change in a Good Way
  • Final Solution: Jobs, leaving
  • Stuff: Chickens and bombs
  • Introduction
  • Toward Spider Spring
  • That's the place Indians talk about
  • We have been told many things but we know this to be true
  • What I mean
  • Mama's and daddy's words
  • Retruning it back, you will go on
  • This song: Beating the heartbeat
  • It will come; It will come
  • No More Sacrifices
  • OUr Homeland; A National Sacrifice Area
  • A New Story
  • Arrival in sudden seaside fog this morning
  • Blue songs for the Phoenix bus depot derelict
  • Many farms notes
  • Old Hills
  • 21 August '71 Indian
  • Small things today
  • Travels in the South
  • relocation
  • Busride Conversation
  • Going for the rain
  • Portrait of a poet with a console TV in hand
  • Surprise
  • Early morning
  • making an acquintance
  • Without you
  • The poems I have lost
  • How close
  • Last night
  • Today, the A-train, 168th to 14th
  • Hunger in New York City
  • Prologue
  • Traveled all the way to New York City
  • For those sisters & brothers in Gallup
  • Evening beach walk
  • A patience poem for the child that was me
  • The Third: Returning
  • The Wisconsin Horse
  • A barroom fragment
  • Four Years Ago
  • Horizons and rains
  • Leaving America
  • The first: The Preparation
  • Washyuma Motor Hotel
  • Passing through Little Rock
  • Sometimes it's better to laugh, "honest injun"
  • Missing that Indian name of Roy or Ray
  • Crossing the Colorado River into Yuma
  • Valley of the Sun
  • A dying warrior
  • I told you I like Indians
  • The significance of a Veteran's Day
  • To and fro
  • The Creation, According to Coyote
  • Fragment
  • Notes on the steps of the San Diego bus depot
  • East of San Diego
  • Crow
  • Returned from California
  • Pain
  • Wind and Glacier voices
  • Alburquerque back again
  • East of Tucumcari -- t Watching you
  • Bend the River
  • Forming Child
  • The Fourth: The Rain Falls
  • Earth Woman
  • Spreading wings on wind
  • For Nanao
  • The Boy and Coyote
  • My Children, and a prayer for us
  • Four Deetseyamah poems
  • My mother and my sisters
  • What Joy said on two occasions
  • Juanita, Wife of Manuelito
  • Four poems for child son
  • A pretty woman
  • Bony
  • Two Acoma pictures
  • For Rainy's book
  • A deer dinner
  • A Snowy Mountain Song
  • Yuusthiwa
  • Hawk
  • Buzzard
  • Dry Rock in a Wash
  • The Expectant father
  • Curly mustahce, 101 year old Navajo man
  • Four rains
  • Morning star
  • A Story of how a wall stands
  • For Joy to leave upon
  • It doesn't end, of course
  • A Good Journey
  • Preface
  • Telling
  • Telling about Coyote
Control code
ocm25629689
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
xiv, 365 pages
Isbn
9780816513307
Isbn Type
(pbk. : alk. paper)
Lccn
92012507
System control number
(Sirsi) i0816512949

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